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. >>> we turn next overseas now and to afghanistan, whereree are getting our first look tonight at grizzly new images from inside that luxury hotel in kabul, swarmed by suicide bombers who went on that deadly attack. in an abc news exclusive, nick schifrin tonight takes us inside. >> reporter: abc news filmed the first images from inside the intercontinental. the attackers blew themselves up in bedrooms, in stairwrwls, in the hallway. the top floor, completely destroyed by fire. on the roof, a massive firefight. the attackers brought bags full of red bull and water so they could fight for hours. for the first time, a senior afghan police official admitted to abc news that his men wouldn't have retaken the hotel without the help of these nato special forces. later this month, afghan forces are supposed to take responsibility for security in parts of the country. but their response to this attack raises questions about whether they're ready. nick schifrin, abc news, kabul. >> nick, our thanks to you. >>> and it's those images that have authorities here at home on high alert this fourth. comb
. neither al qaeda in afghanistan nor pakistan now pose as grave a threat to america as their affiliate in somalia, that according to u.s. counterterrorism officials. the group known as al shabaab has even been successful in recruiting westerners. >> al shabaab is recruiting inside american mosques in somali communities like minneapolis and san diego according to the justice department. >> reporter: congressman peter king, chairman of the commtee on homeland security, held a hearing on the increasing threat. >> the terrorist training camps run by al shabaab teach their participants how to kill people and so the ability of one of those individuals to return to the united states and to put into practice that training is a threat. >> reporter: abc news has learned that before he died osama bin laden was secretly urging al shabaab to target the u.s. at least 40 somali-americans have trained and fought in a civil war in their homeland in the last three years, including three suicide bombers. as many as two dozen remain unaccounted for. >> probably the next, most significant terrorist threat
to afghanistan. >> now is the moment, now is the moment following what happened with bin laden, to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda, as a threat to this country. >> it's such an interesting statement, christiane, because for so many years, some people argue that defeating a decentralized group like al qaeda was essentially impossible. what's your take on this declaration on potential imminent defeat? >> well, he did say if we continue this route. i think that's clear. obviously, al qaeda is spread out to the arabian peninsula, pakistan areas, and the rest. but it's about continuing this route. many people are concerned if there's a withdrawal of u.s. troops they shouldn't be too dramatic or swift to withdraw before al qaeda and taliban are defeated. >> christiane, i appreciate your analysis. i want to remind everybody, be sure to watch christiane a little later this morning on "this week." she has an exclusive interview with white house chief of staff bill daley. bianna, over to you. >>> not too far from her
. mixed with all sorts of people of all ages. >> reporter: before he was killed in afghanistan in february he'd formed a remarkable bond with a stray dog. >> he'd written about this dog that was in the compound. he just loved it. wrote a lot about her. >> reporter: conrad lewis was serving with the 3rd battalion, the parachute regiment. the dog was named pegasus after the regiment's emblem. >> when conrad came back christmas, he said that he wanted pegasus, to bring pegasus back when he came back at the end of his tour. so after he died, we thought that that's what he'd want us to do. so we set t about doing it. >> reporter: it's taken some doing. but thanks to his regiment, the afghan national police, and the charity which rescues animals from war, pegasus is now in the uk. although she hasn't yet got a new home. quarantine regulations mean she'll be in these kennels for six months. for centuries, dogs have played a crucial role during war time, whether it's sending messages or sniffing out land mines. but in peg's case it's been more a question of companionship and loyalty and the impact
. norway has troops in afghanistan. they support the operations in libya. both of those are lightning rods. and perhaps even more to the point, last year, a norwegian paper reprinted those danish cartoons that caused such a firestorm in 2005. >> that's right. we know you'll be following this story extensively for us. thank you for joining us. >>> now gleets back to lara at the park. >> it's hot here in central park. 27 million people think this first one is pretty insane. it is a video that has gone viral. it's shot in broom, australia. two small dogs are using their -- well, their herding skills to try to gather a group of sharks. that wasn't insane enough. one dog decides he's going to take it to the next level and bite one of the sharks. the dog was fine. the shark swam away, intact, perhaps his ego a little bruised. but everybody is good on that one. >>> next up, i love the story of a baby giraffe giving us all hope. that is her name. she is living in the topeka zoo and proving that these boots are made for walking. she was born with her feet on backwards. front to back, so with the he
of people. and not just celebrities and famous people but victims of murder. >> war widows from afghanistan and iraq. an incredible story. >> incredible to watch as it unfolds. >>> we're also going to have more of diane sawyer's amazing interview of jaycee dugard. what a remarkable and resilient young woman she is. and you're going to see more and hear from her. >> the strength and serenity she displays in that interview is just incredible. >>> also, more on casey anthony. we now learned her sentence e w extended by four more days. she's not going to get out until next sunday. we're going to have the latest on that. >>> and also, we'll have the latest on these emergency negotiations in washington to try to prevent the united states going into default. the president actually called the congressional leaders into a rare session on sunday afternoon. and the changes they're talking about could affect every single american. >> in dramatic ways. >>> first with josh elliott with more on the top stories including this horrible story in the ballpark in texas. george and i were watching the videotape
to be dane's dad. he's a marine sergeant who's been deployed in afghanistan since january. obviously a picture-perfect moment there. it's like better than if luke skywalker had walked in. >> his own superhero. >> exactly. pretty amazing stuff. we'll be right back with more "world news now." let me tell you about a very important phone call i made. when i got my medicare card, i realized i needed an aarp... medicare supplement nsurance card, too. medicare is one of the great things about turning 65, but it doesn't cover everything. in fact, it only pays up to " 80% of your part b expenses. if you're already on or eligible for medicare, call now to find out how an aarp... insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company, not paid by medicare part b. that can save you from paying .up to thousands of dollars... out of your own pocket. these are the only medicare supplement insurance plans... exclusively endorsed by aarp. when you call now, you'll get this free information kit... with all you need to enroll. put their trust in aarp p medicare supplement insuranc. plus you'll get this free g
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7